SPECIAL OLYMPICS GB TEAM BRINGS BACK RECORD MEDAL HAUL FROM WORLD WINTER GAMES 2013

Ski Team 2013

 

 

 

SPECIAL OLYMPICS GB TEAM BRINGS BACK RECORD MEDAL HAUL FROM WORLD WINTER GAMES IN SOUTH KOREA

Athletes from Biggin Hill, Tunbridge Wells, Cobham, Llanelli, Aberdeen, Redditch & Rossendale represent Great Britain with pride

The ‘magnificent seven’ Special Olympics GB skiers from Biggin Hill, Tunbridge Wells, Cobham, Llanelli, Aberdeen, Redditch & Rossendale – who have represented their country with such pride and distinction in South Korea at the World Winter Games – have returned to this country today with a record number of medals.

We are delighted to confirm that the final total haul for the Special Olympics GB Team is 13 medals – which includes six Gold, four Silver and three Bronze.

The individual skier results are as follows:

Elizabeth Allen (Llanelli): 2 Gold and 1 Silver

Jane Andrews (Tunbridge Wells): 2 Gold

Robert Holden (Rossendale): 1 Gold and 2 Silver

Clare Lines (Redditch): 2 Bronze

Wayne McCarthy (Biggin Hill): 1 Gold and 1 Silver

Luke Purdie (Aberdeen): 4th, 7th and 8th place ribbons

Mikael Undrom (Cobham): 1 Bronze

These seven skiers from across Great Britain were chosen to represent their country at the Special Olympics World Winter Games in South Korea which took place in PyeongChang, South Korea from 26th January – 6th February 2013.

The athletes were chosen from 73 skiers with intellectual (learning) disabilities who qualified at Special Olympics Great Britain’s National Alpine Ski Championships in Pila, Italy, last year.

Over 100 nations participated in the event in South Korea, with 2,800 athletes with intellectual disabilities taking part. 

Special Olympics GB CEO Karen Wallin said: “I would like to thank our seven skiers for representing Great Britain in South Korea at the World Winter Games with such pride, passion and honour.

“This is a fantastic number of medals and each one of our skiers performed at their very own personal best.”

The year-round sports coaching and events provided by Special Olympics in Great Britain is clinically proven to positively change the quality of lives of our athletes.  Almost 1.2 million people in Great Britain (2% of the population) have an intellectual disability.

Recent research from Canterbury Christchurch University shows that those who did participate in Special Olympics had a higher self-esteem than those who did not take part. Higher self-esteem leads to more feelings of self-worth and more self-care. Findings also concluded that those involved in Special Olympics had wider social networks and lower stress levels.

For further information, please contact:

CHRIS HULL

Special Olympics GB Communications

Mobile: +44 (0) 7713 193927

chris.hull@sogb.org.uk